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Blower: Clicking or Rubbing Sound From Blower Fan

If your blower fan is making a clicking, rubbing, or loud noise, you will need to check the following parts: the housing, washers, flywheel, or impeller nut. Our repair and symptom guide will help you better identify the part needed to be replaced and how. If you need specific repair instructions related to your model, refer to the manual provided by the manufacturer.

Housings
Housings
The plastic impeller housing functions as a plastic cover to shield the impeller, also known as a fan. The housing can become warped or damaged over time, either by impact from an object or from placing the blower roughly on its side. If the housing is warped, it may cause the fan blade to hit the side of the housing, resulting in the clicking or rubbing noise. The impeller housing is a fairly easy part to replace, and can be done by removing the screws which hold it in place and screwing in the new part. There may also be a clip which attaches to your blower tubes to secure them in place when replacing the housing.
The plastic impeller housing functions as a plastic cover to shield the impeller, also known as a fan. The housing can become warped or damaged over time, either by impact from an object or from placing the blower roughly on its side. If the housing is warped, it may cause the fan blade to hit the side of the housing, resulting in the clicking or rubbing noise. The impeller housing is a fairly easy part to replace, and can be done by removing the screws which hold it in place and screwing in the new part. There may also be a clip which attaches to your blower tubes to secure them in place when replacing the housing.
Nuts
Nuts
If the impeller nut comes loose, the impeller can begin to wobble and strike the housings. The impeller is secured to the crankshaft, or motor assembly, by a nut. Sometimes it is a lock nut, other times the nut is secured with Loctite. Disconnect the spark plug before servicing your leaf blower. Remove the impeller housing to inspect the nut, and replace if necessary. You will need a wrench to unscrew the nut, and to screw in the new one.
If the impeller nut comes loose, the impeller can begin to wobble and strike the housings. The impeller is secured to the crankshaft, or motor assembly, by a nut. Sometimes it is a lock nut, other times the nut is secured with Loctite. Disconnect the spark plug before servicing your leaf blower. Remove the impeller housing to inspect the nut, and replace if necessary. You will need a wrench to unscrew the nut, and to screw in the new one.
Washers
Washers
Most blowers have a washer in front of and behind the impeller where it mounts to the crankshaft. A missing or worn washer can change the impeller spacing, causing it to wobble and rub against the housing. To replace the impeller washers, follow the instructions above for removing the impeller housing and nut, first making sure to remove the spark plug. Check the washers for wear and tear or misalignment, and replace if necessary.
Most blowers have a washer in front of and behind the impeller where it mounts to the crankshaft. A missing or worn washer can change the impeller spacing, causing it to wobble and rub against the housing. To replace the impeller washers, follow the instructions above for removing the impeller housing and nut, first making sure to remove the spark plug. Check the washers for wear and tear or misalignment, and replace if necessary.
Flywheels
Flywheels
A damaged flywheel magnet could strike against the ignition coil in your leaf blower, causing a clicking or rubbing noise. To inspect the blower for this issue, first remove the spark plug. Follow the instructions above for removing the impeller housing, nut, and impeller. Turn to the other side of the blower and remove the air filter cover and side cover. Next, remove the throttle cable from the carburetor. You can now remove the other half of the housing from the engine assembly by unscrewing the screws which hold it in place. The flywheel is a metal disc-shaped part, which can be removed by sliding off the washer which holds it on the shaft, and striking the end of the shaft with a rubber mallet while lightly pulling off the flywheel at the same time. If the magnet is damaged, the flywheel will need to be replaced. Match up the...
A damaged flywheel magnet could strike against the ignition coil in your leaf blower, causing a clicking or rubbing noise. To inspect the blower for this issue, first remove the spark plug. Follow the instructions above for removing the impeller housing, nut, and impeller. Turn to the other side of the blower and remove the air filter cover and side cover. Next, remove the throttle cable from the carburetor. You can now remove the other half of the housing from the engine assembly by unscrewing the screws which hold it in place. The flywheel is a metal disc-shaped part, which can be removed by sliding off the washer which holds it on the shaft, and striking the end of the shaft with a rubber mallet while lightly pulling off the flywheel at the same time. If the magnet is damaged, the flywheel will need to be replaced. Match up the new flywheel key with the notches on the shaft, and slide it into place, using your rubber mallet to secure it. Keep track of the parts you disassembled and reassemble them in reverse order.
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Impellers
Impellers
Leaf blowers use an impeller, also known as a fan, to blow the air outward. Air is pulled in via the impeller through the housing, and blown out through the blower tubes. A clicking noise coming from your blower could simply be due to a leaf caught in the impeller. Leaf blowers are prone to accumulating dirt and debris such as leaves because of how they’re used, especially if your leaf blower also functions as a vacuum. The fan blade could also be broken or damaged, causing it to make a noise each time it rotates. A good indicator that the fan/impeller is causing this issue is if the noise occurs with the same frequency as the fan rotation. Always disconnect the spark plug before beginning a repair on your leaf blower. The location of the impeller varies depending on your model; it may be on the side of the...
Leaf blowers use an impeller, also known as a fan, to blow the air outward. Air is pulled in via the impeller through the housing, and blown out through the blower tubes. A clicking noise coming from your blower could simply be due to a leaf caught in the impeller. Leaf blowers are prone to accumulating dirt and debris such as leaves because of how they’re used, especially if your leaf blower also functions as a vacuum. The fan blade could also be broken or damaged, causing it to make a noise each time it rotates. A good indicator that the fan/impeller is causing this issue is if the noise occurs with the same frequency as the fan rotation. Always disconnect the spark plug before beginning a repair on your leaf blower. The location of the impeller varies depending on your model; it may be on the side of the blower, or behind a plastic impeller housing which can be removed by unscrewing several screws. Regardless of its location, the impeller is connected to the motor assembly which needs to be held still in order to remove the impeller. Always disconnect the spark plug before beginning a repair on your leaf blower. Thread an object such as the starter rope, or a screwdriver through the cylinder to keep the motor assembly from rotating. Remove the bolt holding the impeller in place, and replace with your new part.
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