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Drilling, Fastening, and Hammering Power Tools

Why Read This Article?

  • List of drilling, fastening, and hammering tools.
  • Descriptions of each machine type.
  • Lists of features and options.

Article Breakdown

  • Brief descriptions of fastening, drilling, and hammering power tools.
  • Each description provides lists of types, features, and power options.

Drills, Drivers and Hammers

  • Drilling, driving, and hammering are are often combined into one tool design.
  • We discuss them together here, because of their similarities.

Core Drills

Demolition Hammers

Electric/Cordless Drills and Drill/Drivers

Hammer Drills

Impact Drivers

Rotary Hammers

Screwdrivers

Nailers

Plate Joiners

Staplers

Drilling, Fastening, and Hammering Power Tools

October 30, 2009
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This article lists the major categories of drilling, fastening, and hammering tools, and explains the basic applications, types, and features of each.

There are tons of different kinds of power tools, and many different ways to separate them into categories. One of the best ways to simplify thinking about power tools and machines is to separate them into categories of their most basic functions.

This article discusses drilling, fastening, and hammering power tools, and it gives a short description and some quick lists of types and features for each. Although drilling, fastening and hammering are separate functions all their own, we choose to talk about them together because they are very similar and many tools combine some or all of these features in one device.

Each description below is a great starting point for making purchasing decisions and matching the right tool to the job.

 

Drills, Drivers, and Hammers

Application:

For each of these, the application is in the name: drills are for drilling, drivers for driving fasteners, and hammers for hammering. Often, these features are combined in many of the types listed below.

Some or each of these can be powered by pretty much any source available to most power tools, including electric, cordless, gas, and pneumatic.

A wide variety of features are available for each type of drill, driver, and hammer, like safety features, keyless chucks, and variable speed switches, just to name a few.

Chances are that you will (or should) have at least one of these tools in your garage or toolbox if you're using power tools at all. The versatility of a good drill/driver or impact wrench just can't be matched.

For a "Cordless Drills 101" article--Click here.

 

Power drivers, drills and hammers are available in combinations of the following major types, features, and power options:

Major types:

 

Core Drills-

Core drills can be handheld tools or large, stationary rigs. For the most part, core drills are electrically powered, but some gas models are also available. Like most heavy-duty drills, core drills are used in masonry for taking big cylindrical chunks out of stone, and sometimes, metal.

Core drills are right up there in power with rotary hammer drills and demolition hammers.

 

Example: The Fein KBM32Q Metal Core Drill

The Fein KBM32Q Metal Core Drill

 

 

For power core drill parts, click the name of your core drill's manufacturer:

Fein, Flex, MK Diamond

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Demolition Hammers-

Demolition hammers are, by far, the best power tools for making a mess. A piston drives the hammer blade as it slams into concrete or other stone.

Anti-vibration and safety features are especially important to consider with demolition hammers.

 

Example: The Hitachi H45FRV Demolition Hammer

The Hitachi H45FRV Demolition Hammer

 

For demolition hammer parts, click the name of your demolition hammer's manufacturer:

Bosch, Hitachi, Makita

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Electric/Cordless Drills and Drill/Drivers-

Because of their great variation and unmatched versatility, these are most popular type of drilling and driving tools. Drill/drivers balance torque and speed, usually in combination with adjustable settings, to make them an all around tool.

 

Example: Milwaukee 2601-22 Cordless Driver Drill

Milwaukee 2601-22 Compact Driver Drill

 

For power drill/driver parts, click the name of your drill/driver's manufacturer:

Electric: Black & Decker, Bosch, DeWALT, Hitachi, Makita, Metabo, Milwaukee, Porter Cable, Ridgid, Ryobi, Skil

Cordless: Black & Decker, Bosch, DeWALT, Fein, Hitachi, Makita, Metabo, Milwaukee, Porter Cable, Ridgid, Ryobi, Skil

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Hammer Drills-

Hammer drills are usually designed to also serve as drill/drivers, or vice versa. The "hammering" comes from the chuck of the drill oscillating back and forth as it turns, and is generally used for light to medium masonry work.

Of all the hammering tools, a typical hammering or "combi" hammer drill is usually at the least powerful end of the scale, but these are still considerably powerful tools, and their versatility, when combined with drill/driver functions, is indispensable.

 

Example: The Bosch 1194AVSR Hammer Drill

The Bosch 1194AVSR Hammer Drill

 

 

For hammer drill parts, click the name of your hammer drill's manufacturer:

Black & Decker, Bosch, DeWALT, Fein, Hitachi, Makita, Milwaukee, Porter Cable, Ridgid

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Impact Drivers-

These are high torque, low speed drivers that sinks screws and fasteners in as series of short bursts. Their special design is especially useful for driving into harder woods and materials (but not stone), and their torque/speed combination reduces the chance of breaking fastener heads.

 

Example: The Makita 6952 Corded Electric Impact Driver

The Makita 6952 Impact Driver

 

For impact driver parts, click the name of your impact driver's manufacturer:

Black & Decker, Bosch, DeWALT, Hitachi, Makita, Milwaukee, Ridgid, Ryobi

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Rotary Hammers-

Rotary hammers combine the heavy-duty hammering, piston-slamming action of demolition hammers with the drilling features of a hammer drill. Of the hammer drills, these are the most powerful, and they come in a variety of sizes and power options.

 

Example: The Ryobi SDS60 Rotary Hammer Drill

The Ryobi SDS60 Rotary Hammer Drill

 

 

For rotary hammer parts, click the name of your rotary hammer's manufacturer:

Bosch, DeWALT, Hitachi, Makita, Metabo, Milwaukee, Ridgid, Ryobi

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Screwdrivers-

Power screwdrivers are lighter, smaller tools designed specifically for drilling screws. They lack the versatility of drill/drivers, but they are less expensive and work great for users who only need a driver for sinking screws.

 

Example: The Metabo SE2800 Electric Screwdriver

The Metabo SE2800 Electric Screwdriver

 

 

For power screwdriver parts, click the name of your screwdriver's manufacturer:

Black & Decker, DeWALT, Fein, Hitachi, Makita, Metabo, Milwaukee, Porter Cable, Skil

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Major features:

  • Safety features
  • Variable speed switch
  • Keyless chuck
  • Precision bit turning (for rotary hammer drills)
  • Flashlight
  • Exhaust deflection
  • Anti-vibration features

Power options:

  • Electric
  • Cordless
  • Gasoline
  • Pneumatic

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Nailers

Application:

When the idea of swinging a hammer hundreds or thousands of times doesn't sound appealing, power nailers will let let you do the same work with the push of a trigger button.

Types of nailers include roofing nailers, finish nailers, angle nailers, and framing nailers. Most types of nailers are designed for specialty work of some kind, and are specific to one kind of nailer. Framing nailers, on the other hand, are all around work horses.

Nailer power options include a couple of uniques systems, like spring nailers that drive the nails by spring power, and palm-impact nailers.

Power nailers are also separated by how nails feed into the nailer and the size of the nails. "Stick" nailers feed strings of collated nails through the nail gun that are glued to one another, while "coil" nailers feed strings of nails through the gun that are connected by a wire.

Power options, nailer type, and nailer features are all factors that should be carefully considered before purchasing a nailer, so extra research is very important.

 

Power nailers are available in combinations of the following major types, features, and power options:

Major types:

  • Finish
  • Roofing
  • Framing
  • Stick
  • Coil

Major features:

  • Easy load features
  • Jam clearing designs
  • Large trigger (for gloved users)
  • Multiple trigger settings
  • Adjustable nail size
  • Adjustable depth
  • Swiveling air connectors (for pneumatic nailers)

Power options:

  • Electric
  • Cordless
  • Gasoline
  • Electomagnetic
  • Pneumatic
  • Spring
  • Palm-Impact


Example: The Bostitch MCN150 Metal Connector Nailer

The Bostitch MCN150 Metal Connector Nailer

For power nailer parts, click the name of your nailer's manufacturer:

Black & Decker, Bostitch, Campbell Hausfeld, DeVilbliss, DeWALT, Hitachi, Makita, Porter Cable (Coil Nailers), Porter Cable (Finish Nailers), Porter Cable (Framing Nailers), Ridgid, Ryobi

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Plate Joiners

Application:

Plate joiners are used to join the sides of two pieces of wood together, and are also called "biscuit joiners."

Joiners use a small circular blade to make precision, crescent-shaped cuts in the sides of the pieces of wood being joined. After the cuts are made, a small, precisely sized, crescent-shaped piece of wood is inserted into the grooves, and used to joint the two pieces of wood with glue. These small pieces of wood are called "biscuits," giving plate joiners their alternative name.

Plate joiners are usually separated by the size of cut that they make, which corresponds to precise biscuit sizes. Biscuits are manufactured in three general sizes: #0 (5/8" wide 1 3/4" long), #10 (3/4" wide 2 1/8" long), and #20 (1" wide 2 1/2" long).

Because biscuit grooves should be clear of debris in order to make a tight glue hold, dust collection features deserve some extra consideration when purchasing a plate joiner.

 

Plate joiner are available in combinations of the following major types, features, and power options:

Major types:

  • Biscuit Size
  • Electric
  • Cordless
  • Detail Plate Joiner (mini plate joiner)

Major features:

  • Adjustable depth
  • Lock-on trigger
  • D-handle
  • Dust-extraction features
  • Adjustable fence
  • Vacuum/dust bag
  • Carbide-tipped blades

 

Example: The Porter Cable 557 Plate Joiner

The Porter Cable 557 Plate Joiner

For power plate joiner parts, click the name of your plate joiner's manufacturer:

Black & Decker, Makita, Porter Cable

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Staplers

Application:

Power staplers are basically smaller, lower-power nailers for less demanding jobs. These also go back "tackers," and "brad nailers."

A stapler purchase is usually determined, in part, by the size of the brad, nail, tack or staple needed. Size and style of staples usually determine the width and shape of the staple's "crown," the top part of the staple. There are standard, medium, wide, rounded and flat crown staple guns.

Many staplers, tackers and brad nailers, like regular nailers, are designed for specialized work, such as: finishing staplers, fine wire staplers, and pasti-tackers.

 

Power staplers are available in combinations of the following major types, features, and power options:

Major types:

  • Tackers
  • Brad Nailers
  • Finishing
  • Fine Wire
  • Pasti-Tacker

 

Major features:

  • Easy load
  • Jam clearing
  • Ergonomic features
  • Round/Flat crown
  • Crown width

Power options:

  • Electric
  • Cordless
  • Pneumatic
  • Slap-stapler (like a power hammer)

 

Example: The Black and Decker BDBN1202 Cordless Brad Nailer

The Black and Decker BDBN1202 Cordless Brad Nailer

For power stapler parts, click the name of your plate stapler's manufacturer:

Black & Decker, Bostitch, Delta, DeWALT, Hitachi, Makita, Porter Cable, Ryobi

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Conclusion

eReplacementParts.com offers service and replacement parts for each of the the drilling, fastening, and hammering tool categories described above. Most tools and machines need a part or two replaced in their lifetime, even relatively low-maintenance tools, like electric models. Bigger machines like gas-powered models, demolition hammers, and fixed drill rigs need extra care and parts replacements.

Visit our Power Tool Categories page to start your search for the repair part you need, or just type your tool's model number in the search by model number field at the top of this page.

 

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What we're about.

eReplacementParts.com offers service and replacement parts for each of the lawn and garden tool categories described above. Most tools and machines need a part or two replaced in their lifetime, even relatively low-maintenance tools, like electric models. Bigger machines like chainsaws, mowers, chippers, and splitters need extra care and parts replacements.

Please take advantage of our other lawn and garden information resources, such as articles and discussion boards. Or, visit our Lawn and Garden Parts page to start your search for the repair part you need.

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